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Matthew Clark
Matthew Clark

Master Tonal Harmony with Expert Solutions and Explanations for the 7th Edition Workbook


Workbook For Tonal Harmony Answer Key 7th Edition.zip: A Comprehensive Guide




If you are a music student or enthusiast who wants to learn more about tonal harmony, you might have come across the textbook Tonal Harmony by Stefan Kostka and Dorothy Payne. This book is one of the most widely used and respected texts on the subject, covering everything from the elements of pitch and rhythm to the advanced topics of modulation and chromaticism.




Workbook For Tonal Harmony Answer Key 7th Edition.zip



But how can you make the most out of this book? How can you check your answers and improve your skills? How can you find and download the workbook for tonal harmony answer key 7th edition.zip?


In this article, we will answer all these questions and more. We will give you a comprehensive guide on what tonal harmony is, how to use the workbook for tonal harmony 7th edition, where to find and download the answer key, and what precautions and warnings you should be aware of. By the end of this article, you will have everything you need to master tonal harmony and ace your exams.


What is Tonal Harmony and Why is it Important?




Tonal harmony is the study of how chords and melodies are organized and related in music that is based on a central tone or key. Tonal harmony is also known as functional harmony, because it explains how each chord has a specific function or role in creating tension and resolution within a musical phrase or piece.


Tonal harmony is important because it helps us understand how music works and why it sounds pleasing or expressive. Tonal harmony also helps us develop our musical skills, such as ear training, sight singing, composition, analysis, improvisation, and performance. Tonal harmony is the foundation of many musical genres and styles, such as classical, jazz, pop, rock, blues, and more.


The Elements of Pitch and Rhythm




The first chapter of Tonal Harmony introduces the basic elements of pitch and rhythm that are essential for understanding tonal harmony. These elements include:



  • The musical alphabet: A B C D E F G



  • The staff: A set of five horizontal lines and four spaces that represent different pitches



  • The clef: A symbol that indicates which pitch corresponds to which line or space on the staff



  • The ledger lines: Additional lines above or below the staff that extend its range



  • The accidentals: Symbols that raise or lower a pitch by a half step (# for sharp, b for flat, natural for canceling an accidental)



  • The intervals: The distance between two pitches measured in half steps or in terms of scale degrees (major, minor, perfect, augmented, diminished)



  • The scales: A collection of pitches arranged in ascending or descending order (major, minor, chromatic)



  • The key signatures: A set of sharps or flats at the beginning of a staff that indicate which pitches are altered in a given key



  • The circle of fifths: A diagram that shows the relationship between the 12 major and minor keys and their key signatures



  • The meter: The organization of beats into groups of strong and weak accents (simple, compound, duple, triple, quadruple)



  • The time signatures: A fraction that indicates how many beats are in a measure and what kind of note gets one beat (2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, etc.)



  • The note values: Symbols that indicate how long a pitch is sounded (whole note, half note, quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note, etc.)



  • The rests: Symbols that indicate silence or a pause in the music (whole rest, half rest, quarter rest, etc.)



  • The dots and ties: Symbols that modify the duration of a note or rest by adding half of its value (dot) or connecting two notes of the same pitch (tie)



The Basics of Triads and Seventh Chords




The second and third chapters of Tonal Harmony introduce the basic types of chords that are used in tonal harmony: triads and seventh chords. These chords are built by stacking thirds on top of a root note. A third is an interval of three or four half steps. There are two kinds of thirds: major (four half steps) and minor (three half steps).


A triad is a chord that consists of three notes: a root, a third, and a fifth. There are four types of triads:



  • Major triad: A triad with a major third and a perfect fifth above the root (C E G)



  • Minor triad: A triad with a minor third and a perfect fifth above the root (C Eb G)



  • Diminished triad: A triad with a minor third and a diminished fifth above the root (C Eb Gb)



  • Augmented triad: A triad with a major third and an augmented fifth above the root (C E G#)



A seventh chord is a chord that consists of four notes: a root, a third, a fifth, and a seventh. There are five types of seventh chords:



  • Major seventh chord: A seventh chord with a major third, a perfect fifth, and a major seventh above the root (C E G B)



  • Minor seventh chord: A seventh chord with a minor third, a perfect fifth, and a minor seventh above the root (C Eb G Bb)



  • Dominant seventh chord: A seventh chord with a major third, a perfect fifth, and a minor seventh above the root (C E G Bb)



  • Half-diminished seventh chord: A seventh chord with a minor third, a diminished fifth, and a minor seventh above the root (C Eb Gb Bb)



  • Fully-diminished seventh chord: A seventh chord with a minor third, a diminished fifth, and a diminished seventh above the root (C Eb Gb Bbb)



The Principles of Voice Leading and Part Writing




The fourth and fifth chapters of Tonal Harmony introduce the principles of voice leading and part writing that are essential for creating smooth and coherent musical textures. Voice leading is the movement of individual melodic lines or voices in relation to each other. Part writing is the arrangement of voices into harmonic structures or chords.


The main principles of voice leading and part writing are:



  • Maintain good melodic shape for each voice: Avoid large leaps, repeated notes, or awkward intervals; use stepwise motion or small leaps; use conjunct motion within phrases and disjunct motion between phrases; use climax points to create interest; use passing tones, neighbor tones, or other non-chord tones to embellish melodies.



  • Avoid parallel fifths and octaves: Do not move two voices in the same direction by the interval of a perfect fifth or octave; this weakens the independence of the voices and creates a hollow sound.



  • Avoid voice crossing or overlapping: Do not let one voice go above or below another voice; this confuses the identity of the voices and creates an unclear texture.



  • Maintain good spacing between voices: Do not let the voices be too close or too far apart; this affects the balance and clarity of the chords. In general, keep the soprano and alto voices within an octave; keep the alto and tenor voices within an octave; keep the tenor and bass voices within an octave or slightly more.



Avoid hidden fifths and octaves: Do not move two voices in similar motion to a perfect fifth or octave; this creates 71b2f0854b


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